Sodium

Some interesting facts about sodium:

  • Sodium is an electrolyte
    Sodium is one of the electrolyte minerals (the others are calcium, chloride, phosphorus and potassium), which carries an electrical charge and which is positive for sodium. Because electrolytes have electrical charges, they can move easily back and forth through cell membranes. This is important because as they move into a cell, they carry other nutrients in with them and as they move out of it, they carry out waste products and excess water.
  • Sodium works with the other electrolytes to regulate the fluid in the cells
    Sodium works with the other electrolytes to help regulate the level of fluid between the cells, in the cells and throughout the whole body. To balance body fluids, the cells require adequate levels of sodium in between the cells and adequate levels of potassium inside the cells. This is so that the potassium and sodium can move back and forth through the cells membranes and balance fluid levels.
Natural foods, especially fruits and vegetables, have correct sodium:potassium levels. Fruits and vegetables have much higher levels of potassium compared to sodium, which is exactly what is needed for maintaining good health and balanced electrolytes
  • Potassium regulates sodium levels
    Potassium is required to regulate and balance sodium levels in the body - if sodium levels are too high, then eating foods rich in potassium can help to reduce sodium levels in the body and enable them to be both balanced.
  • Processed foods contain high sodium levels
    Foods which are highly processed tend to contain very high levels of sodium and excessive consumption of these foods may be detrimental to blood pressure health.
  • Natural foods have correct sodium:potassium levels
    Natural foods, especially fruits and vegetables, have correct sodium:potassium levels. Fruits and vegetables have much higher levels of potassium compared to sodium, which is exactly what is needed for maintaining good health and balanced electrolytes.

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